Avatar 3D

Avatar 3D may be hurt by the curse of expectation, and it’s hard to keep the message that MOVIE MAKING HAS BEEN CHANGED FOREVER out of your mind once your butt is actually in a seat in front of the thing. The trailers keep telling us how nothing will ever be the same again, and we know the budget of the movie was anywhere from $200 million to $500 million, depending on what report you’re reading. Who knows how much R&D Cameron put into the technology behind the movie.


Even the credits of the film are monstrous: after Industrial Light and Magic and Weta Digital were credited for the special effects, the long line of other effects houses that worked on the movie scrolled by. I lost count of how many different companies leveraged how many different forms of technology to get Avatar filmed. If you’re a fan of cinema, no matter how you feel about the trailer, you need to see this movie; it represents the absolute best that technology can give us in film—at least with an unlimited budget and a small city of geniuses working across a decade to bring it to life.

James Cameron, the film director who pushed technical effects to the limit with the blockbuster Titanic in 1997, and ushered in the dawn of action films with ’80s classics such as Terminator and Aliens, has unleashed the film he has been hoping to make for nearly 20 years.

Avatar, when it is released in December, will be the most ambitious 3D film ever released, and the first trailer, unveiled on the Internet yesterday, gives us a glimpse of the future.

 

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